Event History – 2022

EVENTS HISTORY 2022

The following is a list of events that the IHLCDP has sponsored or presented during the year. Many of our presentations and workshops are available to view as a video or audio recording on our Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention YouTube channel, so if you missed the event you can still access the information.  For events that have a recorded presentation, just click on the button link.

October 3

Finding balance: Sensing our environment to prevent falling

The presentation focuses on 1) healthy adult aging as relates to our nervous and muscular systems to maintain standing balance control, 2) how balance is an integral component in performing activities of daily living, and 3) strategies to ensure optimal balance control throughout the lifespan.

 

Presenter
Dr. Brian Dalton, Assistant Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development
University of British Columbia Okanagan

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar sponsored by the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention

September 20

Evaluating responses to the drug poisoning crisis in British Columbia

This presentation focuses on research examining potential benefits and harms of responses to the ongoing drug poisoning crisis in BC.
Dr. Mary Clare Kennedy presents the findings of recent studies investigating: the health impacts of overdose prevention sites in Vancouver;
the role of drug checking data from Vancouver as a tool for monitoring population-level risk of drug poisoning;
and the effects of discontinuing and tapering of prescribed opioid therapy on overdose risk among people with chronic pain in BC.

Presenter:
Mary Clare Kennedy, PhD
Research Scientist, BC Centre on Substance Use;
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar sponsored by the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention

University peer support: Can non-professional interventions improve student mental health and wellbeing?

As the needs of students evolve and the demand for services increase, universities are searching for new approaches to support students. Although peer-run community mental health programs are effective, the research to understand university peer support is lacking. This talk presents new research from the UK exploring this non-professional intervention for student mental health and wellbeing.

Presenter:
Julia Haas (she/her): PhD Candidate
King’s College London and Student Wellbeing & Welfare Manager, King’s College London Students’ Union (KCLSU)

A Visiting Scholar Webinar co-sponsored by the IHLCDP and UBCO Campus and Wellness Education

Transportation is a social determinant of health: Proven ways to thrive via SMARTer growth management

There’s an old adage – we can’t build our way (widen hwys/new hwys) out of traffic congestion; it costs too much, exacerbates health impacts, precludes climate action. How do we manage growth and move into a climate friendlier future while avoiding summertime smog, smoke, congestion, heat domes and their associated health impacts? The EU has demonstrated sustainably safer and affordable regional, inter-city transport solutions connecting low density rural communities like ours. This presentation discusses how a regional zero emission, hydrail passenger tram-train solution could connect our rural Valley communities, and address health and transport inequities, among many other benefits, all at a fraction of the cost of building more highways.

Presenter:
Dr. Gord Lovegrove, Associate Professor
School of Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science, UBC Okanagan;
Departmental Science Advisor, Transport & Infrastructure Canada, Government of Canada

2022 May 25 Transportation is a social determinant of health

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

Adapting the Serious Illness Conversation Guide for patients from diverse communities

The Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) is used as a primary clinical tool to enhance the quality of advance care planning (ACP) for patients with serious illness using open-ended questions and language to learn patients’ goals, values, and priorities. The guide was developed in a population of predominantly white, well-educated, urban patients in the Northeastern U.S.
This presentation reflects on the cultural safety and linguistic acceptability of the SICG for all English speaking British Columbians irrespective of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

Presenters:
Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, RN, MSN, CHPCN(C)
BC Centre for Palliative Care

Nicole Wikjord, RN, MN, CHPCN(C)
Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority

Adaptations to the Serious Illness Conversation Guide to Be More Culturally Safe – open access link

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar 

Designing web-based resources to support inclusive and safe recreation participation for families and children with autism

Children on the autism spectrum and their families often experience safety-related barriers to recreation. Learn about how parent and provider perspectives are informing a web-based resource to enable inclusive and safe recreation experiences for families.

Presenters:
Lise Olsen, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing,
Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan

Rebecca Anderson, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

Paige Dafoe, Psychology student, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

“it’s only as good as…”: Care at a distance for people with heart beat irregularity

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heartbeat irregularity in Canada and occurs most often in older people. People with AF who needed specialized care during the pandemic were able to receive their care at a distance. This presentation highlights both their support and reservations related to this approach to care.

Presenters:
Dr. Kathy Rush, Professor
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

Lindsay Burton, Research Coordinator
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development
UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

The ‘other health emergency’: Health equity and climate change in British Columbia, Canada

Climate change has created unprecedented challenges for BC communities and its health systems in recent years. This presentation shares evidence on the health equity impacts of climate change, and new insights into how public health systems and community actors can both protect and promote the health of BC communities under a variety of possible climate futures.

Presenter:
Dr. Chris G Buse, Senior Research Scientist
Centre for Environmental Assessment Research, UBC Okanagan

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

Aging in Place: The Canadian Context

Reflections from survey results and focus groups on the meaning and action needed to age well in Canada are shared in this webinar.

Presenter:
Dr. Jennifer Jakobi, Professor
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Aging in Place research cluster Lead; NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering

Learn more here: Aging in Place

 
A  Partnership in Research Webinar 

What’s Next: The COVID Aftermath

Another year has passed, unlike any other that has challenged the health care systems across Canada. As we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, what lessons have we learned to do things better?

As one of Canada’s top health and public policy observers and commentators, no one is more equipped to lead this discussion than André Picard. In 2020, he was one of the first to make a public declaration to ‘shut it down’ and implement physical distancing measures. He has covered all angles of the pandemic—from the status of frontline workers, to the implications for older adults and youth, to the impact on our workplaces.

Picard shares his in-depth insights on post-pandemic health reform with impetus that good must come from all of this.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Health and Social Development, and the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, UBC Okanagan campus

March 2

Aging in Place: Multidisciplinary perspectives on growing older at home

Aging brings many physical, psychological and social changes that result in dynamic and complex changes.
To age in place is the ability to live with adaptability and resilience to maintain functional independence. Considering Canada’s aging population, efforts to support older women and men to age in place is even more pressing today.
Join this Café Scientifique to listen to multidisciplinary perspectives about growing older at home, express your viewpoints, and ask questions to aging experts.

PANEL
Dr. Jennifer Boger, PhD, Adjunct Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Phuong ‘Lisa’ Ha, PhD Student, Sensorimotor Physiology and Integrative Neuromechanics Lab, School of Health and Exercise Science; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Ms. Tiana Broen, MSc Student, Health and Adult Development Lab, Department of Psychology, UBC Vancouver campus; Trainee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus
Dr. Janet Evans, MD, CGB Medical, Kelowna; Member, Advisory Committee, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

MODERATOR
Dr. Brodie Sakakibara, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy;  Investigator, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Investigator, Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus

 
This event is co-hosted with the Aging in Place Research Cluster, UBC Okanagan campus, and Interior Health.

 

February 15

Developing the role of the volunteer to support caregivers of children with medical complexity: A Delphi study

A community-based volunteer has the potential to address many unmet needs family caregivers face throughout their child’s illness trajectory and into palliative care. This presentation describes the development of a volunteer model of care to support those who are caring for a child with medical complexity or in palliative care.

Presenter:
Robyn Thomas, HBSc, Master of Arts Student
Community Engagement, Social Change, Equity theme, Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies,
University of British Columbia Okanagan

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar

January 25

Defying the odds: Positive adaptation in the context of family adversity

This presentation provides an overview of emerging research examining positive adaptation and resilience among those with experiences of early childhood and family adversity. We will breakdown the research findings and discuss implications for policy and practice that promote health equity among trauma-affected populations.

Presenter:
Sarah Dow-Fleisner, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty of Health and Social Development, UBC Okanagan;
Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar (2021 – 2026);
Director for the Centre for the Study of Services to Children and Families

 
A Partnership in Research Webinar

January 12

Improving end of life care: Timely identification of patients who would benefit from a palliative approach

The importance of timely identification of patients with unmet palliative needs, and the limitation of current approaches to early/timely identification is discussed. Newer automated systems of timely identification described can be used to drive quality improvement in end of life care.

Presenter:
Dr. James Downar, MDCM, MHSc, FRCPC
Head and Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Medicine, and
Clinical Research Chair in Palliative and End of Life Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

 
A  Research to Practice Webinar